Day Six: London to Edinburgh

Having gotten my Tajik visa (all I had to do was show up at the embassy and give my name, and my passport was waiting for me behind the desk along with several others – who knew there were that many Tajik visa seekers?) I returned to Edinburgh. Luckily there are some Tajik-English dictionaries online, or otherwise I wouldn’t have known that “БИСЁРКАРАТА” meant I had indeed gotten a multiple-entry visa. I don’t necessarily expect to need that, but it’s extra insurance and it doesn’t cost anything. (It does require providing an itinerary that implies you’ll use it…) The visa is handwritten.

On the way to the train station I stopped at 221b Baker Street, London, known the world over as the residence of Sherlock Holmes.

The Sherlock Holmes museum.  The gift shop was enough for me.
The Sherlock Holmes Museum. The gift shop was enough for me.

Thursday (or that particular day) seemed to be the day for food stalls in public squares in London, which weren’t around on Wednesday. They appeared in Lyric Square in Hammersmith as well as on Euston Street.

In Lyric Square
In Lyric Square

In the UK, trains run on time (compare with a recent experience I had with Amtrak being two hours late, and I’ve heard of worse). They run so much like clockwork that there was a sign in Euston Station warning that the doors close 30 seconds before departure. It’s hard to imagine planning your arrival to the platform down to the second.

I've never seen wine sold like this before.
I’ve never seen wine sold like this before. At a shop in Euston Station.

I took a different (longer) train route back, for variety. The views change a lot when you get to the north of England and into Scotland.

Early in the journey
Early in the journey
Almost there! Scotland sunset.
Almost there! Scotland sunset.

Although the ride was less comfortable than the East Coast going down, it’s still a reminder of what high-speed rail can be like and how lacking it is in the US. This train car blocked GPS, but on the way down we were going over 130 miles per hour. It does make photography difficult, though!

Posted from Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom.

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